Carbon dating science fair project

"Every year the trees in our forests show the swing of Time's pendulum and put down a mark.They are chronographs, recording clocks, by which the succeeding seasons are set down through definite imprints," he wrote in the pages of National Geographic.In its most conventional form, dendrochronology works like this. They have no bias, and they have no political agenda; they just stand at locations all over the world," says Charlotte Pearson, an assistant professor of dendrochronology at the UA, studies samples under a microscope.A contemporary tree—that is, a tree that was either just cut down or still living—can tell you not just how many years it has lived, but which years in which it lived. Credit: credit: Mari Cleven But what if the wood is older?This is a great kit to order with a boxed chemistry set, so kids gain the experience of working with real labware instead of just a few plastic cups and tubes!

"We can use the annual precision of tree rings in combination with carbon-14 to underpin some big questions in terms of the rise and fall of civilizations," says Pearson.Dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating have intertwined histories, she explains, with roots firmly planted at the UA.A 1929 edition of National Geographic boasts, "The Secret Of The Southwest Solved By Talkative Tree Rings." The 35-page article, penned in whimsical prose, was written by Andrew Douglass, the UA scientist who invented tree ring science. In addition to his work as an astronomer at the UA's Steward Observatory, Douglass was the first to discover that tree rings record time.Save time on shopping and comparing items -- get what you need with this quality chemistry lab set for kids 12 & up, all at an unbeatable price.Then get ready for the fun and discovery of doing hands-on science with your students!

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