Manager intimidating employees

Forty percent of individuals have seen a bully refuse to perform tasks, like signing off on paperwork, to ensure that a target would fail.Dealing with a workplace bully is complicated--especially if it's your supervisor.Many people resist filing a complaint against a bully because they fear retaliation. Forty-five percent of individuals say they've seen a bully retaliate against someone after they became aware that a complaint was filed against them.Bullies love allies and quite often, they go to great lengths to get people on their side.Fifty-seven percent of individuals say they've been harshly and constantly criticized by a bully for their performance. So, in an attempt to get more people on their side, they often encourage others to turn against the person being tormented.Fifty-five percent of individuals have seen this happen in the workplace.Sixty-four percent of individuals say a bully has said something like, "Oh that's silly," in a meeting when they've shared their thoughts.Sometimes, bullies use anger to try and control others.

A bully, especially one who is in charge, may claim certain things are against company policy when it's to their benefit.

Sixty-eight percent of individuals say a bully clearly showed hostility with their body language.

Bullies often try to minimize their target's contributions or embarrass them from sharing.

A whopping fifty-three percent of individuals say they've seen a bully stop just short of crossing the line into illegal behavior. Forty-six percent of individuals say they've seen a bully lie about another person's performance during the evaluation process in an attempt to sabotage that individual's career. A bully who has some power may make arbitrary rules and then accuse the target of being insubordinate if those commands aren't followed.

Forty-six percent of individuals have witnessed this first-hand.

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